Greenpeace ‘Save the Arctic’ Lego Movie Pulled from YouTube

July 15, 2014 at 1:32 am (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , )

It looks like LEGO and its corporate pals are more offended by a video than by the idea of Shell’s plan to drill for Arctic oil. Despite the real risk of a terrible and unstoppable oil spill in icy, pristine waters, Shell is determined to plunder every last drop of oil it can.

Just like it’s not OK for a tobacco company to market to children, an oil company has no place promoting its brand on kids’ toys. So that’s why we’re asking LEGO to show the world – and our children – that an ethical company won’t work with Shell.

LEGO said last week that it’s “determined to leave a positive impact on society and the planet”. So are we! That’s why we’re working together to protect our oceans, rainforests and the Arctic.

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The Warner Bros. corporation, the film production company behind the “The Lego Movie” based on the famous toy brand, has forced YouTube to remove an online video created by environmental campaigners at Greenpeace designed to expose the troublesome relationship between the company that makes the popular building blocks and a dangerous push for Arctic drilling by Shell oil.

Greenpeace had taken issue with Lego’s ‘offshore drilling’ themed toy set, created in conjunction with Shell and featuring its logo, and last month—as part of a larger campaign to ‘Save the Arctic‘ from offshore oil and gas drilling—initiated an effort designed to expose and end the relationship.

As part of the campaign, Greenpeace created an animated online video which used the Shell-themed Lego pieces as a set to show a devastating offshore oil spill in the Arctic. According to the group, “The film depicts an Arctic made entirely of LEGO, and imagines an oil spill in this beautiful and pristine part of the world. In real life, big oil company Shell plan to drill in the Arctic, with the very real risk of a huge oil spill that would destroy this unique ecosystem.”

After receiving nearly 3 millions hits in less than a week, however, the video was pulled from YouTube sometime on Thursday. According to Greenpeace, it was Warner Bros. specifically that pushed for its removal.

And the note on YouTube page where the video was states: “This video is no longer available due to a copyright claim by Warner Bros. Entertainment.”

by Good German on July 11, 2014 in News
500px-LEGO_logo.svgCopyright or censorship? Or both?

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The coming oil crisis.

June 2, 2008 at 5:59 am (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , )


An oil crisis is looming, are you scared? Can you imagine what would happen and are you prepared for it?? Are you really ready, to carry the groceries home every-week??? All by yourself????!!!!

Within the energy profession there are groups (e.g., ASPO, ASPO-USA) grappling with the challenge of “Peak Oil.” While the efforts of Al Gore and others have raised awareness of the threat of global warming, society is not in any way prepared for the imminent decline in global oil production.

In the near term, declining production will impact certain countries more than others. Cantarell, the largest field in the western hemisphere, is declining rapidly. Over the next couple of years, Mexico’s economy will be hard-hit.

Without imports, the USA’s domestic oil reserves would be exhausted in three years at the current rate of consumption. The Oil War option is losing favor. Technological breakthroughs will be too slow and voluntary conservation will be too shallow to avert widespread disruption of economic activity, especially transportation and consequently food. Lacking the political will to make conscious, rapid, drastic changes, Americans will be subjected to Mother Nature’s adjustments; She did not negotiate with the Mayor of New Orleans; nor will She negotiate the American Way of Life when Saudi Arabia’s Ghawar field collapses of its own accord.

Liquid fuel substitutes (tar sands, coal-to-liquids, oil shale, surprisingly even ethanol and biodiesel) are carbon intensive and will only exacerbate global warming. Plus they cannot be scaled up on a timely basis.

It would take one new nuclear power plant every week until 2050 to fill the oil gap. Minor detail, uranium shortages would emerge long before 2050, unless as yet unproven breeder reactors come on line soon.

While it will take time, direct conversion of solar radiation to electricity (photovoltaics and concentrating solar power) can be scaled up. One viable sustainable alternative also exists for repetitive travel (e.g., commuting — more than half of all urban transport). It is the rapid build-out of solar powered electric vehicles on fixed guideways (the “podcar”). A continuous solar array, well within the width of the guideway, is sufficient to provide 100% of the power required for this efficient form of high capacity transit.

http://www.oilcrisis.com

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